Experience a Michigan Fresh growing season

posted on April 22, 2013 9:58am

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EAST LANSING, Mich. – With the change of seasons, many of us look forward to the return of warmer weather. With it, comes fresh Michigan produce.

Our state offers an abundance and variety of choices at farmers markets and grocery stores. Consumers who are looking for information on when to buy each type of fruit or vegetable and how to cook or preserve it need look no further than Michigan State University (MSU) Extension’s Michigan Fresh initiative.

Michigan Fresh provides consumers with researched-based information from experts across the state.

MSU Extension educators developed a series of Michigan Fresh factsheets that provide information about using, storing and preserving locally grown produce, as well as growing and harvesting it. There are also factsheets with tips for growing a thriving garden or keeping an attractive lawn.

Confused about the best time to pick or purchase produce for peak flavor and nutrition? The factsheets give the best harvest times. Not sure which varieties are best for baking, cooking or preserving? The factsheets cover that. Worried about storage and food safety? They offer handy tips to prevent contamination and spread of food-borne illness. Many offer recipes and directions on preserving.

In addition, the factsheets supply tips to the home gardener on growing small fruit, tree fruit, tomatoes and fall vegetable crops; starting seeds; testing soil and transplanting for a healthy garden. Other factsheets cover tips for buying and using fresh herbs, the basics of pressure canning and summer lawn care.

“Michigan Fresh can help residents and consumers learn more about growing, harvesting, eating and preserving Michigan produce,” said Kathe Hale, MSU Extension educator.

“The factsheets are designed to give consumers information about a variety of Michigan products and the seasonal availability at Michigan farmers markets and community-supported agriculture programs. For residents who want to plant and grow their own produce, there are factsheets that can help them get started,” Hale said.  “They’re also intended to give people the information they need, but will also encourage them to eat more fruits and vegetables.”

Find the factsheets ‒ from apples to winter squash ‒ on the Michigan Fresh website at MSUE.anr.msu.edu/program/info/mi_fresh. Check the site throughout the growing season as more factsheets are added.


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